Christopher Brower, Ph.D.

Assistant Professor

Biology

Christopher Brower, Ph.D.

Contact

cbrower@twu.edu
940-898-2706
GRB 323

View CV

Biography

Dr. Christopher Brower received his PhD in Biochemistry and Molecular Biology from the University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center where he studied gene expression. He then was a post-doctoral scholar in the division of Biology and Biological Engineering at the California Institute of Technology where he learned genetic engineering. As a scientist at Caltech, Dr. Brower generated a number of genetically modified mouse models in order to study the role of protein arginylation in cellular protein breakdown. Dr. Brower discovered that the loss of protein arginylation in mice causes a dramatic loss of fat and resistance to diet-induced obesity. He also discovered that arginylation was important for the removal of a number of pathogenic forms of proteins known to be associated with neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis, and frontal temporal dementia. Dr. Brower is continuing this research at TWU. His laboratory is currently funded by the National Institutes of Health to examine the role of arginylation and protein degradation in neurodegenerative disease.

Education

Ph.D., Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, OK, 2001
M.S., Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, OK, 1998
B.S., Cellular Biology, Northeastern State University, Tahlequah, OK, 1994

Research Interests

Protein Degradation; Ubiquitin Proteasome System; Autophagy; Gene Expression; Neurodegeneration; Metabolism

Latest Articles

The N-termini of TAR DNA-binding protein-43 (TDP43) C-terminal fragments influence degradation, aggregation propensity and morphology
Molecular and Cellular Biology (2018)
Yasar AT Kasu, Samrawit Alemu, Angela Lamari, Nicole Loew, Christopher S Brower

Analyzing N-terminal Arginylation Through the Use of Peptide Arrays and Degradation Assays
Journal of Biological Chemistry (2016)
Brandon Wadas, Konstantin I Piatkov, Christopher S Brower, Alexander Varshavsky

Degradation of the Separase-cleaved Rec8, a Meiotic Cohesin Subunit, by the N-end Rule Pathway
Journal of Biological Chemistry (2016)
Y J Liu, C Liu, Brandan Wadas, Christopher S Brower, Z H Song

Liat1, an arginyltransferase-binding protein whose evolution among primates involved changes in the numbers of its 10-residue repeats
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (2014)
Christopher S Brower, Connor E Rosen, Richard H Jones, Brandon C Wadas, Konstantin I Piatkov

Current Projects

Understanding the role of TDP43 in neurodegeneration and its degradation by the N-end rule pathway – Funded by the NIH-National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke. Brower C.S., Piatkov K., and Varshavsky A. (2013) Neurodegeneration-Associated Protein Fragments As Short-Lived Substrates of the N-End Rule Pathway. Molecular Cell, 50:161-71. Kasu YAT, Alemu S, Lamari A, Loew N, Brower CS. (2018) The N-termini of TAR DNA-binding protein-43 (TDP43) C-terminal fragments influence degradation, aggregation propensity and morphology. Mol Cell Biol doi:10.1128/mcb.00243-18. Understanding the role of ATE1 in fat and energy metabolism – Funded by TWU Research Enhancement Program. Brower C.S. and Varshavsky A. (2009) Ablation of arginylation in the mouse N-end rule pathway: loss of fat, higher metabolic rate, damaged spermatogenesis, and neurological perturbations. PLoS One. 4:e7757.

Externally Funded Projects

Understanding the Role of TDP43 in Neurodegeneration and Its Degradation by the N-end Rule Pathway
GOV-National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) | $372,857.00 | 2016
Role: Principal Investigator

Internally Funded Projects

Mentor - Chancellors' Research Program
Chancellor's Research Fellowship | $3,000.00 | 2019
Research Grant

Mentor - Chancellors' Research Program
$3,000.00 | 2018
Research Grant

Understanding the role of ATE1 in fat and energy metabolism
TWU, Research Enhancement Program | $10,000.00 | 2018
Research Grant

The role of ATE1 in fat and energy metabolism
$10,000.00 | 2016
Research Grant

TWU Chancellors' Research Fellow
$5,000.00 | 2015
Research Grant

TDP43 toxicity and its degradation by the N-end rule pathway to prevent neurodegeneration
$10,000.00 | 2015
Research Grant